The Common App Essay Prompts 2016-2017

We are pleased to share the 2015-2016 Essay Prompts with you.

  1. Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.

  2. The lessons we take from failure can be fundamental to later success. Recount an incident or time when you experienced failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience?

  3. Reflect on a time when you challenged a belief or idea. What prompted you to act? Would you make the same decision again?

  4. Describe a problem you’ve solved or a problem you’d like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma-anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution.

  5. Discuss an accomplishment or event, formal or informal, that marked your transition from childhood to adulthood within your culture, community, or family.

The changes you see reflect the feedback and consensus of nearly 6000 individuals who responded to our recent survey. Among the survey highlights:

•  197 individual Member responses representing 110 Member institutions

•  5667 constituent responses (64% school counselors; 14% students; 11% independent educational consultants; 4% parents; 2% community based organizations; remainder = other)

•  82% of Members and 90% of constituents agree or strongly agree that the current prompts generate effective essays on the whole

•  62% of Members and 48% of constituents believe the “story/background” prompt is the most effective

•  76% of Members and 44% of constituents would like to see the “place where you’re content” prompt replaced

•  35% of Members and 30% of constituents feel that analytical ability and intellectual curiosity (as a combined percentage) are most the difficult attributes to convey through the current prompts

•  85% of Members and 82% of constituents feel the prompts should be left open to broad interpretation

•  3% of Member respondents suggested Topic of Your Choice as a new prompt

•  6% of constituent respondents suggested Topic of Your Choice as a new prompt, with the breakdown as follows: independent educational consultants (47%), community-based organizations (7%), school counselors (5%), parents (2%), other (2%), students (<1%)

Attention Juniors: The 2016-2017 college application season has officially begun. The Common Application, otherwise known as the Common App, released its list of essay prompts.

The application doesn’t go live until August, but this is your one chance to tell the colleges your “story,” and we encourage you to start thinking of an answer now.

Overall, admissions offices are looking for you to reveal something that distinguishes you or sets you apart from others in your own voice. The current word count on the essays is 250-650 words. You must stay within this length.

Families working with International College Counselors will work directly with their counselors on the content and editing of the essays, so there is no need to worry. For families interested in essay editing only, please visit our sister company, Edit The Work.

PROMPT #1: Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.

This first question is broad and gives you a lot of latitude. The prompt asks you to write about either a passion or something that defines you as a person. This means write about something unique and specific to you and no one else. The best essays include a story you need to tell in order for people to understand you. A “background” central to your identity can include your religion or ethnicity, living in a foreign country, experiencing a challenging issue growing up, or a unique family situation. Make sure you describe how your background affected who you are, what you value, and how you approach your life. If you choose to write about an “interest” or “talent,” (i.e. sports, the arts, speech and debate, stamp collecting, bird watching, performing magic tricks, etc.), make sure you reflect on how it shaped you on a deep level. It’s critical that you reveal more about you than what you like to do or how good you are at doing it. Make sure the story you choose is one you haven’t told elsewhere in your application.

PROMPT #2: The lessons we take from failure can be fundamental to later success. Recount an incident or time when you experienced failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience?

Admissions doesn’t really want to hear about your failure, rather, they want to know how you thought you failed, how it affected you, and what positive lessons you learned. A good answer to this question will reveal how you deal with and overcome hardship. A great essay will show that you are the kind of person who can bounce back and learn from an experience. Do not choose a trite failure like losing a race. Also, do not draw attention to something you did that was illegal or dangerous, like distracted driving. If you can’t keep your essay positive, do not choose to answer this question.

PROMPT #3: Reflect on a time when you challenged a belief or idea. What prompted you to act? Would you make the same decision again?

“Challenged a belief or idea” means that you took some kind of action either on your own behalf or on the behalf of someone or something else. In this essay then, you need to speak passionately about a belief or an idea, in a compact story with a beginning, middle and end. In the essay you also need to express what you learned from the experience. Responses are supposed to be personal, but make sure your idea of belief is not controversial. You do not know who will be reading your essay and you certainly do not want to turn anyone off to you. It is better to show that you are open-minded and have respect for the beliefs and ideas of others. And don’t preach. The admissions committee includes this prompt for students who define themselves by what they believe in and/or what they are willing to stand up for. Some ideas: An essay about pursuing an activity even though an adult told you wouldn’t be successful in it; an essay about challenging a group of friends who told you to do something that you thought was wrong; an essay about standing up for someone you saw being treated unfairly — perhaps even yourself.

PROMPT #4: Describe a problem you’ve solved or a problem you’d like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma-anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution.

If you choose to answer this essay, you need to identify a problem with meaning and importance to you. This can be any problem “no matter the scale.” One variation of this is a community service project. Other variations include not eating meat, bullying, not having money, school tests, etc. So don’t stress about not having a significant issue to write about. Even an everyday problem with significance to you can be turned into a great essay. Colleges like to see how the thinking, so include your decision-making process. It is also very important to choose a problem that is specific and meaningful and can end with you providing a solution – as the prompt asks. Do not choose a problem that is superficial or generic. This essay should tell the colleges what you value and give them an idea of your outlook on life. If you elect to tackle this particular question, take advantage of the opportunity to demonstrate creative and critical thinking skills.

PROMPT #5: Discuss an accomplishment or event, formal or informal, that marked your transition from childhood to adulthood within your culture, community, or family.

In this prompt, both “accomplishment” and “event” leave themselves open to interpretation. This means, you can write about anything from a formal event to a very small happening. However, remember that the admissions reader is looking for a moment in your life that really changed you as a person. Everyone is different so an event or accomplishment might encompass anything from birthdays and weddings (formal), to achievements like earning an award or winning an election (informal). Other topics can be something as simple as working with a mentor, visiting a relative’s old neighborhood, or eating a particularly meaningful meal. You know you found the right story when it has the element of transition and transformation. The event or accomplishment you discuss should be something that helped you understand the world around you in a more adult way or forced you to “grow up.” In other words, choose an event, challenge or experience where you learned something that made you feel more capable and grown up.

IMPORANT SUMMARY NOTE: Admissions wants a glimpse of your personality, your values, your interests and your passions. They want to get an idea of what kind of attitude and energy you will bring to the classroom and campus life.

Do not have someone else write your essay, and do not wait to write your essay. Our favorite essays always took a lot of time and effort!

Filed Under: College Essays, International College Counselors blogTagged With: 2016 common app essay, 2016 common application essay, 2017 common app essay, 2017 common application essay, common app essay, common app prompt, common app question, common appellation question, common application essay, write common app essay

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